Old English Game - Oxford - Chicken

Partridge Oxford Old English Game pullet

Old English Game - Oxford Details

Uses
Moderate egg layer, table bird, exhibition. Traditionally used for cock fighting.
Origin
Great Britain
Class
Light, hard feather
Colour
black-breasted dark red, black breasted red, streaky breasted light red, black breasted silver duckwing, black breasted
Comb
Single
Eggs
Tinted
Weight, cock
2.5 kg
Weight, hen
1.4 kg
Parentage
An ancient breed of unknown parentage
Sitter?
A reliable, persistent and defensive broody. Having similar defensiveness to the Indian Game and Car
Autosexable?
No
Breed Ratings
Temperament
Hardiness
Egg Laying
Table Value
Flightiness
Brooding

Old English Game - Oxford Description

The Old English Game was originally known simply as ‘Game fowl’ prior to the banning of Cock fighting in 1849 and is often referred to as Pit Game. Due to a demand from many to improve the original pit game for exhibition, those that bred the Pit Game split the breed into two types In the 1930’s, the Carlisle and the Oxford. Those that formed the Oxford club wanted OEG to retain the original ‘Game’ type with the qualities of pit game. The Old English Game remains an athletic, aggressive and flighty breed suited to low maintenance free range rearing. Oxfords have the original cock fighting type they are alert and agile and are close heeled and courageous.

 

The Oxford Old English Game is quite possibly the hardiest, most resilient and defensive of all native breeds. They can be utilised for domestic egg production and produce medium sized eggs or can be used as table birds in their own right.

 

Traditionally it is regarded that a good game fowl cannot have a bad colour. The habit, alertness, type and balance of a bird are most important when selecting birds for breeding or when they are exhibited as Oxford Old English Game.

 

Dubbing is often practiced on OEG cockerels.  


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